How the Pandemic Changed My Teaching – The Moral Dilemma of Going Back

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How the Pandemic Changed My Teaching – The Moral Dilemma of Going Back

Professor Eric Mazur will discuss his recent insights and innovations from teaching during the pandemic.

Photo by Nate Dumlao

February 16 at 1:00 pm 2:00 pm


About the Online Presentation

The MIT Teaching + Learning Lab is very pleased to welcome Eric Mazur, Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics and Academic Dean for Applied Sciences and Engineering at Harvard University, who will discuss his recent insights and innovations from teaching during the pandemic.

Traditionally education has been constrained by the walls of the physical classroom, requiring education to be synchronous and at a pace set by the instructor. The pandemic, however, opened the door to learning outside of the physical classroom, hinting at a future where students are engaged across time and space in a blended environment.

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND BY ZOOM


About the Speaker

Photo by Stu Rosner

Eric Mazur is the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics and Academic Dean for Applied Sciences and Engineering at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Harvard University, Member of the Faculty of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and Past President of Optica (formerly The Optical Society).

Mazur is a prominent physicist known for his contributions in nanophotonics, an internationally recognized educational innovator, and a sought-after speaker. In education he is widely known for his work on Peer Instruction, an interactive teaching method aimed at engaging students in the classroom and beyond. In 2014, he became the inaugural recipient of the Minerva Prize for Advancements in Higher Education and has received many awards for his work in physics and in education and has founded several successful companies.

Mazur is widely published in peer-reviewed journals and holds numerous patents. He has also written extensively on education and is the author of Peer Instruction: A User’s Manual (Prentice Hall, 1997), a book that explains how to teach large lecture classes interactively, and of Principles and Practice of Physics (Pearson, 2015), a book that presents a groundbreaking new approach to teaching introductory calculus-based physics.

Mazur is a leading speaker on optics and on education. His motivational lectures on interactive teaching, educational technology, and assessment have inspired people around the world to change their approach to teaching.